DIT, 5-21-12

Attendance: Ed Bolan, A.P.; Raevan Askew, A.P.; Rick Carroll, Teacher; Carlos Castillo, Teacher; Danielle Williams, Teacher; Alan Gold, Teacher; Shamena Alli, Teacher, Karen Phillips, Teacher.

Agenda
  1. Data Reports
  2. Review last week’s minutes
  3. Next Steps

1. Data Reports
We reviewed materials on wiki and in DIT binder. We determined what would be beneficial for the upcoming SQR. Team members will check for additional data.

2. Minutes clarified and posted on wiki.

3. Next Steps
Next meeting - May 31, 2012

Attendance at DIT meeting. We have to commit to consistent attendance at DIT meetings.

DIT Composition. Limit the number of DIT members next year.



DIT 5/14/12

AGENDA
SQR - DIT prep

Review of minutes

Building team binder - additions

Future Meetings:
5/21 - Monday
5/28 – Memorial Day

Present: Ed Bolan, Raevan Askew, John Greggo, Carlos Castillo, James Gibbons, Daisy Guadalupe, Shamena Alli, Danielle Williams, Karen Phillips

Team members sat down to share reflections, address concerns, and re-visit expectations of teaching and learning as a result of the administrative walk-through.

Expectations for DIT Members
  • Support and assist staff in meeting the expectations of teaching and learning.
  • Communicate specific next steps for staff in order to meet instructional expectations.
  • Attend house and/or department meetings to offer help and support.
  • Provide clarity for the classroom walk-through checklist (RSC-TASC)

Classroom Environment
  • Student work must be reflective of all subjects/classes that work in that room. Traveling teachers must have space to post work.
  • Bulletin boards must have a description of a rigorous task, specific rubric, examples of student work, feedback (pros and cons, highs/lows), and specific next steps towards future improvement.
  • Bulletin boards must show a sampling of all classes taught in that room.

Instruction
  • Lesson plans need to be specific to the students who you are teaching with reference to students with disabilities and ELLs, and address all instructional expectations.
  • Teachers should re-visit instructional expectations (attached to the last two weeklies).
  • Students need to be able to discuss what they are doing and why they are doing it.
  • Classroom instructional segments should be evident based upon student behaviors (i.e., work period, student engaged in task).
  • Differentiation should be evident in process (hand-outs, texts), content (scaffolding for students based on need), and product (differentiated tasks).
  • Technology is evident and meaningfully integrated into the lesson: Smart Boards are interactive; laptops are used appropriately;
  • Students should have at least two (2) opportunities to engage with one another, such as Turn and Talk.
  • Evidence of assessments to gauge whether or not Learning Objective was met.
  • Teachers are referring to Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) for Learning Objectives, discussion questions, differentiation of tasks, and scaffolding supports. Teachers have to be versed in who has an IEP.
  • ICT Classes. Both teachers are taking an active instructional role. There is evidence that students with disabilities are being further supported through scaffolding, differentiated texts, grouping, and consultations with teachers.
    • 6 Models that UFT supports for ICT (see UFT website)
    • I teach, you observe is not one of the most effective in supporting differentiation and scaffolding.

Student Graphic Organizers
In class, students should have different graphic organizers:
  • lower levels – partially filled in
  • upper levels – nothing filled in, or maybe no graphic organizer


DIT, 4/30/12

Attendees: Ed Bolan, A.P., John Greggo, A. P., James Gibbons, Shamena Alli, Karen Phillips

Team created the May Leverage, Issue 4 as a resource for teachers for the SINI review on May 23 and 24.


DIT, 4/23/12

Next Meeting:
Monday, 4/30. Agenda: Finalize material for early May Leverage.

Attendees: Ed Bolan, A.P., Daisy Guadalupe, Teacher, Carlos Castillo, Teacher, James Gibbons, Shamena Alli, Karen Phillips

Update on ELA Testing
We had 1599 students with completed tests on Friday.
We completed 18 more exams today, so we have 1617 – We are at 97.4% of students.

Quality Review – Wednesday, 5/23 and Thursday, 5/24
Leverage Edition for Quality Review

Science Lab Test –the same week.

Deadline for Leverage – put it out on May 7th.

Leverage
  • oChecklist for Classroom:
    • o While putting your room back together, what has to go back up:
      • § Standards, L. O. on blackboard and Smart Board
      • § Updated bulletin boards, rubrics. Date of work – after 4/23
      • § Feedback that includes next steps
      • § Use Depth of Knowledge in Learning Objective
      • § At least 3 critical questions for each lesson, using DOK or Bloom’s
      • § Revised Classroom Goals
      • § Updated Word Walls

School has to create Binders of Evidence . What is the DIT doing to help develop ELLs and SpEd

School has to present evidence of what we are doing.
DIT
Departments -
House Meetings

How we are scaffolding information, breaking it down, giving them access to it.
Big thing with ESL teachers is them transitioning to more rigorous tasks. They’ve been working with breaking it down.

EVIDENCE
ExC-ELL – go through vocabulary.
37.5 Minutes – Which students are staying.
ELLS afterschool program
Saturday Academy
3 Days during the break – 1st time ELA takers
SES – a lot of SpEds and ELLs
7:30 a.m. – 8:10 - Carlos Castillo does math sessions, M-F since January
Up to 14 students
Lunch Sessions – James Gibbons has people coming up for lunch.
Classroom Libraries – Teen Biz and Leveled Libraries

We have to demonstrate that we are giving the students every opportunity to succeed, and we are giving them exposure to rigorous material.
Predictives – We could put a bar graph scheme showing growth. We could have something to identify a pattern over time showing growth.
Next year we’ll use the same MP2 and MP3 to track growth.
MP3 ELA we processed better than we processed the MP2. If we do an MP4 we’ll do it on-line in ACUITY and Acuity grades it.
BE SURE TO INCLUDE “most likely,” “best,” “least likely,” questions in multiple choice tests.

As a team, we are telling the staff about “most likely, “ “best,” etc. Are staff members implementing these.

We can make a test on ACUITY and let’s see if the students are doing well.
We need to do some tracking.

MP4 – Language Arts Performing Series.

Instructional Strategies
Turn and Talk – in 25 minutes there should be a turn and talk

Audio Book – Guided Reading. Do a book on a higher level.
Balance between challenging them and overwhelming them or boring them.

The Tell-Tale Heart – good audio versions. It keeps their interest.


Suggestion for ELA Meeting: Diana DeVito and or Nate can come in to talk about instructional strategies. As an A school and to be teaching rigorously, what should we be doing?

What does rigor look like in your room?





DIT, 4/4/12

Attendees: R. Askew, E. Bolan, R. Carroll, C. Castillo, J. Gibbons, A. Gold, J. Greggo, D. Guadalupe, K. Phillips

Reviewed 3rd MP Math test results via grade.


6th Grade
33 problems out of the 50 that 40%+ got wrong.
10 questions that 60% or higher got them wrong.
Stamina is an issue.
#50 is a yes or no question. 23 students show C or D, which was not an option.

Focus of Questions
4, 44, 45 had to do with area and volume. Students added when should have multiplied, or they multiplied incorrectly.
31 - find the mean. Student didn't correctly average.
37, 38 - students rounded incorrectly.
47 is an algebra problem
48 comparing fractions -
49 solving equation

Class 652 outperformed the grade.

Questions
Out of last 7 questions, the only one they did okay on was 46 - modeling relationships with equations.


Grade 7 Math – 534 Exams Graded
      • of Question
% Right Answer
% Distractor
Type of Question
13
B – 246 – 46%
None
Decimal Division. Evaluating formulas
20
C – 54%
B – 23%
GCF – factor chosen, but not the greatest
24
D – 46%
B – 29%
Customary conversion of yards and feet, regarding volume
25
A – 54%
B – 24%
Converting fractions to percent.
Lack of knowledge of comparison of %s to fractions.
28
D – 56%
None
Incorrect use of unit measures. Process of elimination and/or to know the mass of a car. Number sense
29
B – 55%
A – 35%
Changing a phrase to an algebraic equation.
Vocabulary – not interpreting key word – less – to a subtraction.

Grade 8 team: C. Castillo, J. Greggo, D. Guadalupe

Highlights from 373 students in 8th grade:

  • 14 questions with more than 40 percent incorrect with 8 distractors
  • Q8: B (correct answer); D (distractor); Finding Slope Using Points (Question Type)
  • Q17: D (correct); A (distractor); Slope -- Y Intercept (Question Type)
  • Q18: D (correct); A (distractor); Graphing Equations: Slope -- Y Intercept (Question Type)
  • Q19: A (correct); no distractor; Finding Slope Using A Graph (Question Type)
  • Q22: A (correct); C (distractor); Geometric Transformations (Reflection)
  • Q27: A (correct); D (distractor); Translations
  • Q30: B (correct); no distractor); Relationships/Rate of Change
  • Q34: D (correct); A (distractor); Percent as Ratios
  • Q40: C (correct); A (distractor); Sales Tax
  • Q44: D (correct); B (distractor); Percent Increase
  • Q45: A (correct); B & C (distractors); Simple Interest
  • Q46: D (correct); no distractor; Percent Increase
  • Q47: D (correct); no distractor; Ratios & Percents
  • Q48: C (correct); no distractor; Ratios & Percents

Note, stamina was a concern with eight graders, as well as slope, ratios & percents, and geometric transformations. Also, Q8 and 17 had students select the answer with the wrong sign.

DIT, 3/29/12

Attendees: Rick Carroll, Alan Gold, Carlos Castillo, Daisy Guadalupe, John Greggo, James Gibbons, Karen Phillips

School-wide, we’re still having trouble with best, most likely, figurative language. Students are rushing and not taking the time to go back into the text for details to support the most obvious answer.

Grade 6. Students had problems with the following questions.

6 - Figurative Language

Out of 6, 2 - Vocabulary

5 – Drawing Conclusions (2 of 5 were Author’s Purpose)

1 – Compare Contrast

1 – Cause and Effect

6 - most, not, most likely, best

General Test Stamina



7th Graders had trouble with identifying:
setting of a poem, alliteration, inferred information, Author’s Purpose and Tone, words in context, test stamina

7. Poem
42% right; 35% distractor
Right: Night Distractor: Late Afternoon
Knowledge: Setting, Time of Day.
Suggestion.
Underline signal words in poem: “sunset, twilight, starlight, early night, day closing, gradual slumber, half the night I wandered.”

8. Poem. Alliteration. “The serving-maid was singing softly.”
Right – 54%
Wrong Choices: personification, 20%; symbolism, 12%; metaphor, 13%
Suggestion.
Tell them to go from simplest to hardest when trying to identifying the type of figurative language.

Begin with checking

Sound of Poem
1. Alliteration - Repetition of initial sound in a line of poetry. Alliterative sounds add emphasis and zing.
2. Repetition. Are lines, or parts of lines repeated for emphasis?

Meaning of Poem
3. Simile – like or as
4. Personification
5. Metaphor
6. Symbolism - very unlikely


10. Poem. Inferencing.
Right – 55%. “…the speaker based the poem on a similar real-life experience.”
Wrong – 45%, no distractor.

12. Poem. Identifying word “like” as part of a simile. Right – 53%, no distractor.

13. Poem. Author’s purpose., Tone of words. Right – 55%;

22. Minotaur Myth. Words in Context. Right – 51%;
Tone, emotion conveyed. 26% selected “eagerly” as a synonym for “grudgingly.”

27. Right there information. B. Right – 50%
“…modern poetry may not appeal to many people because it
Answer: “is too difficult.”
Quote from selection: “One criticism of today’s written poetry is that much of it is hard for ordinary people to read and enjoy.”
Suggestion. In selecting the right answer, words from the selection and words in the question/answer might differ but be similes: hard - difficult



8th Grade Students need to locate “right there” information.
Students need to use process of elimination.
Figurative Language
Students had trouble with most likely

10. Narwal. Right there information.
Right answer D, avoiding water that is too cold.


TWO CORRECTIONS
10. Incorrectly Scanned. Scanned right answer as D: brains.
Right Answer should have been, A: eyes and ears
Right – 25%; 57% picked D” brains.

11. Incorrectly Scanned. Scanned right answer as B. Definition 2 (adj).
The correct answer should be A – 68% chose A.

Challenges
12. Poem. Setting, Landscape.
53% right; 47% selected desert, river, or backyard.
Suggestion. Underline signal words: every dell and hollow, green of spring, tree-tops, waving meadow grass

14. Poem. Compare/Contrast. 39% chose B, right answer. 32% chose A
– Never is repeated to show…
The students read “Never a bud or leaf again,” “Never a mated bird…” as showing despair. Missed preceding phrase, “But for fattening rain, We should ….

17. Eat Less Meat. Right there information. 51% right. 49% wrong.
Suggestion. In selecting the right answer, words from the selection and words in the question/answer might differ but convey the same meaning.


26. 54% right. 29% equated “grave” with “deathly.” Vocabulary issue.

28. 49% right, A. 23% chose C. Syntax was difficult. Students couldn’t understand quote, “Never have any…”


March 19, 2012
Attendees: Ms. Alli, Ms.Askew, Mr. Bolan, Mr. Castillo, Ms. Collins-Smith, Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Gold, and Ms. Guadalupe.
The meeting began at 3:30pm due to staff pictures that was held at 3:10pm in the auditorium. We began with a review of protocols and norms. Mr. Bolan reviewed roles for our meeting. Mr. Gibbons- facilitator, Ms. Alli-Minutes, Mr.Gold-Dialogue Manager and Mr. Bolan-Time Keeper.
DIT Meetings
We began with a discussion on when the DIT members should meet. We are missing a few members due to other after-school commitments. Mr. Bolan reminded the team that we were thinking of Mondays instead of Thursdays. The team agreed that for the next two Mondays, 3/26 and 4/2, would be good. Ms. Askew reminded the team that the Saturday Academy was going to be moved to three Mondays, 3/26, 4/2 and 4/16 in preparation for the State exams. Mr. Bolan reminded us that 4/16 is faculty conference from 3:10 to 3:45pm. Ms. Alli reminded the team that Ms. LaRosa, Ms. Collins-Smith and herself are involved in SES on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. It was agreed that Mondays are a good idea for future meetings.


March 8, 2012
The meeting began at 3:15. In attendance were Mr. Greggo, Ms. Alli, Ms. La Rosa, Ms. Collins-Smith, Ms. Phillips, Ms. Guadalupe, Mr. Gold, Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Bolan, and Mr. Carroll. We discussed what we wanted to do for this issue of Leverage. Mr. Carroll used 821 as an indicator, and he mentioned that there was one question from the Coach Book 50-question over the vacation assessment that everybody in 821 missed. The question: “What is the root word in Disruptive?” Every student in 821 chose Disrupt, totally disregarding that Dis is a prefix. (The correct answer was rupt.) Then we discussed and added relevant material for Math, such as relevant vocabulary. Also, by differentiating Acuity, this well help get the students ready for the State test. The meeting ended at 5:15.
Respectfully submitted,
R.L.Carroll



DIT 2/16/12
NEXT Meeting
Facilitator – Jim Gibbons/Ms. Askew
Time - Daisy
Dialogue Manager – Alan
Minutes – Rick Carroll
2/16/12
Facilitator - Jim Gibbons
Minutes: Karen Phillips
Attendance: Alan Gold, Shamena Alli, Daisy Guadalupe, Jim Gibbons, Karen Phillips, Rick Carroll, Carlos Castillo
Agenda
Brief on Meeting
Look at attached document to find a truly similar school that has made AYP on SWDs and ELLs in ELA and Math
CFN Data Specialist Meeting – Fine Tuning the Team’s Effectiveness
Conducted by Diane DeVito, Warren
  1. Sharing of some data across the network for unidentified schools. The result on the extended responses for the 2010-2011 ELA exam.
Across the network, the focus on writing. The students need to work more on details and give more supporting details.
DIT teams are charged with moving teacher teams forward.
We need to change the instructional process according to their process.
Book – Classroom Instruction That Works, 2nd Edition – Geri B. Dean.
10 Practices in Four Categories:
Environment for Learning – 3 practices
Helping Students Develop Understanding – 4 practices
Helping Students Extend and Apply Knowledge – 2 practices
Putting the Instructional Strategies to Use – 1 practice
Reviewed video of a teacher team using a practice and looking at 3rd grade student work. The students were doing a venn diagram.
2. Protocol for teachers discussing student work called, “Say Something Protocol.”
Vivien Trotter – The Power of Teacher Teams
What do we have to do to make a difference?
  • Suggests that we have to get teachers to look at student work and share teaching practices amongst themselves.
  • Look at ourselves and make observations of each other.

  • Chapter 5 from book, The Power of Teach Teams:A self-assessment
    • Continuum Assessment
    • 5 Areas: Task Focus, Leadership, Collaborative Climate, Personal Responsibility, Structures and process
Looking at schools making AYP in SWDs and ELLs
Daisy – 07X223, 84K508
Shamena – 02M131 - Math only
31R072
31R002
Karen and Rick
09X413
04M825
24Q093
20K227

Total Pop
SWD Pop
ELLS
Free Lunch

09X413
156, 6-8
456, 7-12
41
23
76%

04M825
362
65 – 18%
11 – 6%
96%

24Q093
1299
195 - 15%
181 - 14%
63%

20K227
1391
208 - 15%
473 - 34%
88%
Made AYP
Only in Math with ELLs
217
1675
251 - 15%
267 - 15.94%
81%

07X223
469
68 - 14.5%
75 - 16%
87%







MS319 – Washington Heights – Ysidro Abreu
Worth the visit to see what they’re doing in ESL and Math
2 Schools that made AYP in both ELA and Math
21K468 – 240 Student
09413
Agenda, Wednesday, 2/1, 3:15 – 5:15.
Facilitator: Jim Gibbons
Timekeeper: Ed Bolan
Minutes: Karen Phillips
Agenda: Analyze Social Studies and Science Data by grade and class.
Present: Jim Gibbons, A. Gold, E Erosa, R Askew, D Williams, J. Greggo, R. Carroll, E. Bolan, S. Alli, K. Phillips, D. Guadalupe, C Castillo.
We divided into grades and work charted the correct answers and distractors for students of each class.
At the beginning of the meeting Rick and Karen worked on creating 6th and 7th grade Acuity tests for the ELLs Saturday program. They found that students had to read about 200+ words for each multiple choice question. Before they could complete a test, the Science data was ready to be reviewed.
Data Inquiry Team 1/19/12
Present: Ed Bolan, Lisa LaRosa, John Greggo, Carlos Castillo, Daisy Guadalupe, Shamena Alli, Alan Gold, Rick Carroll, Karen Phillips, Jim Gibbons, Danielle Williams, Raevan Askew.
Next Meeting: Wednesday, 1/25 – Meet for 3 hours: 3:15 – 6:15.
Agenda
3:15 – 3:50 Mrs. Alli and Mrs. Collins Smith Share out from Performance Series
3:51 - 4:10 Mr. Gibbons Review from CFN meeting.
4:10 – 5:10 ELA 6,7,8 grade groups devise- strategies by grade level according to findings
5:10 - 5:15 Set up for next week
Scantron Performance Series. Edperformance.com. http://performanceseries.com
Presenter yesterday was Guillermo Nava, Global Scholars, subsidiary of Scantron
Independent Reading Levels. Some teachers piloted Scantron Performance Series to get the reading levels, instead of doing the running records.
Site: 80-1071-5203
Staff ID: DOE username
Password: file number
Student Log-in: OSIS #
Complex Texts – Scaffold it for the students, but students are going to have to read through complex texts on their own during the
Common Core is all about the piece of text that is being used. If there is no text, the lesson is unsatisfactory. It’s about
  1. the text
  2. What is teacher doing to help students understand the text
What is expected of teachers: the pre-operation stuff, what teachers need to do to prep them for the poem.
How can we support the Common Core Learning Standards? What is inquiry team doing to support the Common Core.
Why don’t we look at a Common Core task. How can this team teach this Common Core task to ELLs?
The whole school is doing Editorials as a Common Core task.
CFN Meeting – Reviewing math and how it’s related to shortcomings. Our shortcomings are in the short written response. Numerous kids who answered multiple choice, were at level 2, and could have been level 3, if they had gotten credit for the short response questions.
Suggestion; Throw in a written response for homework.
QUESTION for Math DEPT. Is it one POW that all teachers have a rubric to, and are they grading the same way? No, at this point.
Math teachers have identified a task for each grade. The next step is that the math teachers will develop a rubric.
40 POWs grade 6, 40 POWs grade 7, 40 POWs grade 8.
If they have trouble with extended response questions, should tasks be differentiated for different levels in each grade?
POWs should be grade-wide, so that teachers can have the same rubric, look for trends.
Look at the same piece of work, indicate thru item analysis if high, medium, low level, and how can we get the
Looking At Student Work (LASW) Protocol.
Math teachers will work. Mr. Greggo can create the questions by taking them from the state tests.
First develop same POWs for each grade.
DIT looks at student work.
Then we could decide on how to differentiate it.
ELA and Math maps are drafts that have to be tweaked. For each unit in mathematics, we have to have a specific POW.
For each unit, we want a clear picture of what’s happening in each unit.
Mr. Gibbons Review from CFN meeting.
LASW – everyone is looking at the same child, same work. CFN is going to re-look at the implementation of LASW. Evidence of student work and binder of what students are doing.
ELA 6,7,8 grade groups devise- strategies by grade level according to findings
If we can zero in on particular classes and suggest strategies for specific strategies.
Suggestion: Teachers pair up and teachers exchange classes. Students would be able to hear another voice.
Next Week: Math results for the 2nd quarter. Next Wednesday we are going to meet to go over everything to break down the math.
Greggo broke it down by class.

DIT Meeting 1/9/12

Next Meeting: Thursday, 1/12/12

We didn’t re-designate a note taker, so I took these notes, but they’re sketchy. Add information, as you see fit.

Agenda
1. 3:15 – 3:45.
Meet as group and decide how to break into grade groups and develop protocol for test review.
2. 3:45 – 6:15
Meet in grade groups, review exam results, determine interventions teachers can use.
3. 5:15 – We shared observations. Some people left and we decided we would finish on Thursday.

1. What to look for.
What kinds of questions did the students get wrong?
What skills did they lack?
Identify distractors. Significant percentage and/or equal to or more than % right answer.

Tell Teachers:
1. These are the questions that children got wrong.
2. These are the skills that they need.
3. Here are the Common Core State Standards that align with specific questions

During Our Review
Look at every question that 35%+ got wrong.
Identify “best and most likely” in questions in classroom exams.

Former ways we had children identify types of questions:
Right there information - Right There Questions are questions where the answers can be found right in the text, often in one or two consecutive sentences.

Inferencing - Drawing Conclusions

Think and Search Questions - Think and Search Questions are questions where the answer is in the text, but the students need to look in several different places to find it.

Author and Me – Author and Me Questions are questions where the answer can be found by using your thoughts and knowledge as well as information in the text. Student makes text to world connections.

Example - 7th Grade Review. This chart is incomplete.
% Right
Right answer
Distractor
Comments
1.According to the article, masses of snow and ice are called glaciers because they
a. sink
b. move
c. are so cold
d. are so large
b. move
DISTRACTOR
D. 55%

D. are so large
Student had to find sentence in the text and ignore any prior knowledge that glaciers are large.
2.



3. 54% right



4.



5.



6. 52%
paraphrase.
Where would you look to find information on global warming.
a. blog
b. encyclopedia
c. environmental activist website
d. weather forecast in newspaper
Encyclopedia
Many children chose d - weather forecast.
Maybe they don’t know what an encyclopedia is.

They don't know the difference between global warming and weather.

I think you could go to an environmental activist website.
7. 59%



8. 35%
D
Distractor – C

9. 31%

Distractor A – 40% (calm)

10. 43%



11. 29%



12. 32%



13. 78%



14. 55%



15. 61%

20% -

16. 49%

B. Distractor 29%

17. 72%



18. 43%

D. Distractor 38%

19. 32%

B. 44%

20. 21%

C. 48%

21. 57%



22. 51%



23. 36%

A. Distractor 52%
Teach 1st, 2nd, 3rd person narrator. Point of View in the context of the test refers to 1st, 2nd, 3rd person, or omniscient narrator. It does not mean perspective.
24. 84%



25. 42%



26. 77%



27. 80%



28. 54%



29. 33%



30. 61%



31. 57%



32. 46%
C


33. 39%
B


34. 66%



35.
B


36.
B


37.



38. 79%



39. 30%

36% A.

40. 58%

B 17%

41. 64%




Share out. - Findings.

  • Students are not closely reading. They are not comprehending, sometimes because of vocabulary.
  • The distractors did trick them, but many questions had no distractor; the wrong answers were spread pretty evenly across three wrong answers.
  • They are not returning to the text to check for information, even though during class Mr. Bolan sees students supporting answers with references to the text.
  • In 7th grade, even though the skateboard reading was in the 2nd half of the test, the students did best on this reading.
  • We have to find out if there is talk of getting rid of the "most likely" wording in the tests. If so, we shouldn't focus on it. If it will remain in, the students have trouble with these questions.

Respectfully submitted,
Karen Phillips





DIT 1/5/12

Next Steps:
Meetings:
Friday, 1/6. Email Ms. Askew a period that you are available to meet on Friday, 1/6 to determine cut-off numbers.
Monday, 1/9. 3:15 – 6:15 p.m. We'll all meet and divide into 6th, 7th, 8th grade review teams.
Balance of time to be determined.

Thursday, 1/12. 3:15 – 5:15

Finalize List of Targeted Former Ells and SpEd Students
  • Notify Teacher Teams of ELLs that they have to focus on.
  • Copy of inquiry process and linke to Inquiry Handbook
  • Entire school needs to have entire list

Saturday Program Placement

Roles for Monday, 1/9.
Analysis of MP2 ELA Exam.
Pick out trends and distractors
Facilitator – Bolan
Minutes – Askew
Food – LaRosa

Parking Lot Issue
Suggestion – In weekly update, DIT entry about strategies for differentiation

Focus on former ELLs and SWDs

Monday, 1/9 – 6, 7th, 8th grade teams. Analyze results of ELA exam.

Expectations of DIT: We look at assessment and give it back to the teachers with distractors and other data.

Language To Use: Former ELLS. Let’s not just use the term ELLs, because then teachers think the ELL students are not their problem. Once

State and AYP. For us, if we fail to make AYP in Special Ed and F-/ ELLs, we could be closed down. If you start failing in one demographic, the state comes in and makes change - changing staff, mandating curriculum, etc.

To see a state review - Research on Google: Catherine and Count Basie, JIT Review, March 2011
August Martin JIT Review.

Mr. Burns needs to know what to budget for. Sit for 6 hours – 1 day, during the week, or one day on a Saturday, or 3 days afterschool for 2 hours, so we can analyze the ELA exam.

Next week: ELA data, so we can give it back to the ELA teachers.
Following week: Do the same thing with the math.

Mr. Bolan’s Report on How ELLs are Counted towards AYP
  • How does an ELL student taking a student for an 1 year and a day – takes exam- no impact
  • A student with a gap in testing – it counts
  • Poor Attendance and AYP – Mr. Burns and administration will work on something to get kids

Can we generate a list of students who are not making AYP. Any student who’s a 1 is not making AYP, but how do we target them? If high 2, we know we want to make them 3.

If a students improves from 2.5 to 2.9 or 1.5 to 1.9, the state doesn't give the school credit for growth, The state only gives credit by moving students up from one level to the next level.

If we look at the scale score and see how far away the student is from the next level, we can determine which students to focus on.


ELLs and Special Ed
Program to move:
2 – 3 program
1 – 2 program

ELL program is starting January 10th.

How many students can we handle?
We have a limited number of teachers.

Social Studies is focusing on supporting ELA, using certain language, analyzing texts and questions.

Purpose: We looked at NYS data.

Teacher Teams’ Targeted Students
Once we have kids, we’ll know how the teachers picked students. Many of the teachers did not pick ELLs and SpEd.
Look at the Wiki – columns for ELLs and SpEd, very few have taken.

If we had chosen, we could have given suggestions.

Data Inquiry Handbook – has an inquiry cycle. Let's give all teachers a copy of this inquiry cycle.

Selecting Students
Some teachers thought that Special Ed teachers would be targeting SpEd students, so they thought they didn't have to address those students.

Each quarter we will do an analysis of the exams.

For our 6th, 7th, and 8th Graders
1 – 2 classes/Saturday program

ELLs – We had 23 high 2’s.

ARIS Report – ELLs, IEP, Attendance - Measure and Time Correlation Report
Report 5 in ARIS.

Finalize List of Targeted Former Ells and SpEd Students
Notify Teacher Teams of ELLs that they have to focus on.
Copy of inquiry process and linke to Inquiry Handbook
Entire school needs to have entire list
Saturday Program Placement

Wording could be: "Enclosed please find the list of students that must be included in your students to focus on."

As a team, we have to support the teachers, so teachers understand that all students with IEPs are SWD students and all former ELLs are still ELLs. We have to clarify "SWD" for teachers:– any student who has an IEP is an SWD. If you have a former ELL, who is performing at a 3.8 level, and you have 10 students who are 1.8 to 2.9, you will focus on the students who are 1.8 to 2.9.

We have to identify ELLs/former Ells, and SWDs in all of our classes. Hispanic kids must be targeted, because as a disaggregated group, they are not growing and achieving enough.


What we need to do
Strategies and tools teachers can use to work with the SWD and F-ELL students, while still needing to reach the gen ed students.


All Ells, Former Ells, Students with Disabilities
List of all targeted students to all teachers – Ask teachers if anyone is missing from the list (underscoring F-ELLs, SWDs).
These kids must be on teacher teams’ targeted lists
These kids must be in Saturday program
These kids will be in afterschool program
We create folders for all of these students

Students who are SIFE students.
We will use SINI funds to teach in their native language – SWDs and ELL students.

Respectfully Submitted,
Karen Phillips


Notes from 1/5/11 Meetin

DIT Meeting, 12/8/2011

Next Meeting – Thursday, December 15, 2011.
Roles
Facilitator – James Gibbons
Ed Bolan – Dialogue Manager
Danielle Williams – Timekeeper
Minutes – Karen Phillips

Agenda
3:10 - 3:14 - Set up
3:15 - 4:35 - Introduction and Review of Vocabulary PD with CFN Mrs. DeVito
4:36 - 5:00 - Leverage News Letter Draft to be completed
5:00 - 5:10 - Clean up / set up for next meeting.

1. Vocabulary Professional Development. Donna DeVito came in and worked with the Special Education Department. It will be a school-wide initiative. RIGHT NOW, Special Ed teams are trying out one of the three strategies that Donna DeVito presented.

Objective: Direct Vocabulary Instruction. Vocabulary Development. Weave more vocabulary into our lessons.

One of three strategies that was discussed in the PD
6 Steps – After the students are accustomed to this, you can do this as a “Do Now.”
1. Provide a description
2. Students restate and record.
3. Students construct a picture.
4. Students engage periodically in activities that help them add to their knowledge of the terms.
5. Periodically ask students to discuss the terms with each other.
6. Involve students periodically in games that show them to play with terms.

When you use the tool, the students are practicing. When you create a task for the students, then you include rigor.

To begin with, students in Mr. Gibbons’ classes are taking about 15 – 20 minutes.
After practice, 8 minutes per word.

Special Ed department will identify which words the subject team will teach for 2 – 3 weeks at a time.

One of the expectations, at the end of the meeting, the team will meet together to teach the 5 common words that they will be teaching.

Teachers can adapt the strategy to their students and style to increase level of rigor.

Question: Do we think this vocabulary system will help our students?
The data that was shown shows that the system works.
Did people at the workshop think it will work? The response was mixed. The expectation leaving the professional development was that each teacher team would adopt the strategy.

PD was to give explicit strategies. She gave 3 of the strategies. Each team would adopt 1 of the strategies, collect student work, and see if there is improvement.

Purpose of PD, we were looking for strategies that had something that was tangible, that students would have a folder or binder with vocabulary.

Rigor – what words we are using.

QUESTION for TEACHER TEAMS: Are the same expectations of what students do with vocabulary consistent across the curriculum?

Four-Square Chart for Vocabulary Building – Sample distributed:


Defintiion

Text Box: WordWor
Text Box: WordWor

Picture
Exit Ticket: How does this relate to ?


LEVERAGE Newsletter. We began working on the newsletter and we will complete it next week, 12/15/11.
2. Suggestion: Look at one question, going to the test or poem.
Positive, negative and neutral words.

3. In addition to Mock Quality Review. Differentiated Quality Review. We did not make AYP for our SpEds and ESL. The focus of this QR is to look at our self-contained classes, because we did not make AYP in ELA for ELLs for 2 years. They are looking at all of the areas impacted. They wanted to see practice in an ICT class. It is like a SpEd Quality Review. This one is official.

The mock QR is being conducted by our CFN.

Opening Paragraphs will drive what we put underneath.



December1, 2011
The meeting began at 3:15. In attendance: Mr. Bolan, Ms. Guadalupe, Mr. Gold, Mr. Carroll, Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Castillo, Ms. Alli, Ms.LaRosa, Ms. Collins-Smith, Ms. Williams, and Ms. Askew. Mr. Gold presented the following agenda:
1) Review goals and expectations for group activity
2) Break up into Math and ELA groups to review teacher action plans based on teacher data.
3) Share results of group work
4) Create the second issue of LEVERAGE
5) Share out
6) Also, Mr. Carroll had e-mailed members earlier about getting 15 minutes on the agenda re: relevant data he now had after an assessment of his 3 classes with a “New Vocabulary in Context" test.


The first thing discussed was that at the next House Meetings, all APs should focus on the data from this current issue of LEVERAGE. Then Mr. Carroll brought in his data on the 20-question New Vocabulary in Context test he had given his 3 classes. Mr. Carroll tried to make a case that the students need to read the questions first, go through the article/poem and put a check mark if something seems familiar (perhaps just a fragment of text remembered from the questions already read) read the article/poem, and then answer the questions. Ms. Guadalupe brought up how most of her 6th grade students can’t handle remembering more than about 3 questions before reading the article, and Ms. Askew said that ELLs and Spec. Ed. Students would also have a hard time remembering the questions before the article. Mr. Carroll didn't have time to pursue this issue or other issues related to the assessment test he had administered due to his promise to use no more than 15 minutes of the DIT time, but had he been able to stay on the above mentioned topic longer this is what he would have discussed:

Since it is understandable that 6th graders, ELLs, and Special Ed. students might have a hard time remembering all of the questions related to a particular article/poem prior to reading the actual article/poem, perhaps the answer would be for them to read the first question, and then read the article/poem until that question, with its solution comes up. In fact, that might be the way to do it for most students, switch continually between question and text. I sincerely believe that the question first tends to sharpen the focus of the reader, because looking for an answer becomes paramount while reading the text. (The questions are usually always in chronological order.) In the case of the poem below, it is fairly typical of how poetry works: (If we are indeed discussing "rigor," then movement in poetry and prose is one of the more complex aspects. My apologizes to Literacy Teachers and others reading this wiki post if you already know all of this.) There is a movement in attitude by the narrator of a more complex poem from beginning to end, much as there is a movement in the development of a character in a well-written short story or novel from beginning to end. (Even in a television show like All in the Family, the Archie Bunker we see towards the end of the series is nothing like the Archie Bunker most of us disliked right from Jump.) In the most difficult of poems, sonnets, the movement occurs in the Petrarchan or Italian Sonnet on line 9--the sonnet turn--in which the poet has made his/her case for whatever he/she wishes to make a case for in the first 8 lines (say the positive aspects of love) and then begins line 9 with "yet," or "but", or "although," etc., and then flips to the negative aspects of love ("Yet love can truly break your heart in two") for the remainder of the sonnet's 14 lines. (In the Shakespearean or English Sonnet the turn occurs on Line 13.) If a student during an ELA test only focuses on what the poet is saying towards the end of the poem, he/she will miss (in most cases) the total point of the poem. That is probably why so many of my students missed Question 8 of my assessment test (see below): The action changed at the end, so that is what had left an impression in their minds. However, if more students had read the question first and simply put a check mark when they saw information related to that already read question as they were reading the poem, they would have, in most cases, gotten that question correct. Here is the poem:

The Apple Seller
The day in the park was bright and most children did play,As the tired old man sat selling apples all day."Ah! Take them I crave, take all I have here,"As he stood by his table the crowd standing near.


The people loved his apples, they were the best in town,And eating one of his apples became a smile from a frown.And since the old man seemed happy, they thought him a clown,Nobody knew it was an act, how far he'd come down.

From a top paid executive, to selling apples in the park.Now a phony smile, from a brain and heart with true spark.He once looked in the mirror and admired his triumphs,Now the mirror showed him that he was just down in the dumps.

A hungry boy watched him, from a seat on the grass,He took the time to wait for the usual crowd to pass."Oh kind sir, I am starving, have you an apple to spare?"And the old man gave him five apples, and one hidden pear.

The hungry boy was delighted, he would eat for the day,And so would his sister, and their dog named Fay.And the old man saw the beautiful sky, how the Sun made it so,And it was nice, that he could feel alive, just bathing in the glow.
8) In the line, "Ah! Take them I crave," the trope (the expression) take them I crave as used in the line most likely means:
A) He desires to sell them
B) He desires to trade them
C) He desires to give them away
D) He really wants to keep them

Too many of my students chose "C" because of the generous deed the apple seller does at the end of the poem. (He's probably sick of eating apples, so the "hidden pear" he probably brought for his own lunch. So he not only gives up for free that which he is selling, he also gives up something a little more near and dear to his heart...something he himself desired to eat. And, indeed, he is then rewarded with a sudden feeling of "although I'm broke, it's a beautiful day in the park right now, so why worry?" at the end of the poem.) However, if the student read Question 8 before reading the poem, lines 2 and 3 in the first stanza plus all the subsequent information thereafter about how he was a top executive but had been reduced to selling apples in the park--this would have given the student the correct answer, i.e., he wants to sell his apples, answer "A." And that's what "Ah! Take them I crave" means in context.

Another item Mr. Carroll didn't have time to discuss was the results of Questions 16 and 20. See Below:


16) In the sentence, "I guess I'm condemned to make this trip to the South," the word condemned as used in this sentence most likely means:
A) Determined
B) Fearing
C) Meant
D) Doomed

20) In the sentence, "There lies the intrigue of Stone Mountain," the word intrigue as used in this sentence most likely means:
A) History
B) Location
C) Trickery
D) Fascination

These two questions clearly show that we need to reiterate that old chestnut about the differences between positive, negative, and neutral words. Suffice it to say--without going into a major analysis of each question with the article from whence they came--had the student the understanding of positive, negative, and neutral words, more would have chosen "D," the correct answer for both above questions.

Finally, the ELA member of the DIT broke away and discussed the Action Plans from Election Day, and how those plans should be presented in LEVERAGE. Unfortunately, there were still some loose ends, so it will have to be the next meeting in which the ELA section of LEVERAGE is finally worked out.

The Math members of the DIT were a bit more fortunate, in that they came up with the following Instructional Action Plan: 1) In addition to the P.O.W. ("Problem of the Week") there will now be W.O.W. ("Words of the Week."); 2) Word Problems should be broken up into understanding the context of the words being used in the problem, and then the mathematical operations which follow from those words.

Respectfully Submitted,
R. L. Carroll





[f1]
[f2]

Staff Welcome to our DIT home page.

11/17/11
In attendance, L. LaRosa, A. Gold, C. Castillo, D. Collins-Smith, S. Alli, J. Gibbons, R. Askew, J. Greggo, E. Bolan, D. Guadalupe, D. Williams, R. Carroll
Roles: John Greggo, facilitator; Daisy Guadalupe, minutes; Lisa LaRosa, dialogue manager; Alan Gold, timekeeper

John (admin view) and Shamena (teacher view) gave us a presentation about Datacation; its web site is skedula.com. Data team teachers are encouraged to register and use the program. Under student and portfolio, biographical information can be viewed. Schedules can also be shown from the menu bar. There is also an anecdotal log that shows behavioral comments. Additionally, attendance can be seen. Kids have access to schedule, assignments and graded assignments. Parents can also view attendance and anecdotal logs. Teachers can upload assignments easily and input grades, as well as assign standards. It is a combination of Engrade, ARIS, SnapGrade, and HSST. This would ideally replace eChalk.

In the attendance section, you can indicate who is present and who is not. Also, if the child has an excused absence -- Resource Room, nurse or dean, it can be recorded. Finally, cuts can be logged and anecdotals recorded.

Additionally, pre-printed letters can be retrieved from PupilPath, which instructs parents on how to use the site.

For ARIS historical information, go to students, portfolio, then kid's name on the left menu, and, lastly, top menu bar "exams". Currently, grades are available in ARIS prior to parent-teacher conferences. Also, under portfolio is a high school tracker that color codes attendance, state exam scores and quarterly grades -- red, yellow, and green.

Under admin, John showed under reporting and data analysis that a large number of reports are available, including breakdowns of special groups like SWDs, ELLs and students failing the first marking period. Invert shows how to select one or two, as opposed to all or none from the menu. Under mock bubble sheets, eventually, once scantrons have been scanned then they can be viewed automatically by teachers, parents, kids and administrators.

Next, Lisa, Alan and Carlos discussed how the PD went on Election Day where teachers identified potential distractors and compared to actual distractors from the first marking period assessment. Her co-presenter, They pointed out that although action plans were not done; teachers bought into doing this quarterly. Lastly, in the Math Share Out portion, two teachers pointed out that their respective classes had differing distractors that could have been based on instruction and were willing to discuss their instructional approach to improve performance for the next assessment. Then, James and co-presenter John explained how teachers looked at the item analysis for the science dept.'s first marking period exam to identify what was confusing to the students; e.g., vocabulary. Also, trends were identified from seventh to eighth grade. Next, Rick, Daisy and Raevan (co-presenters) noted that teachers had the opportunity to work on several action plans and the teachers from Talent and Social Studies discussed how their vocabulary could expand to improve instruction across the curriculum. Finally, Ed, Doreen and Shamena (co-presenters) discussed that the teachers were very comfortable with data and most ELA teachers had already looked quite deeply at the data. Also, it was a very mixed group as some of the teachers had no exposure like ESL and some were well-versed with the information. Doreen added that teachers are really internalizing data. Shamena said that despite technical difficulties; it worked out at the end. Ed concluded that our findings and action plans will be included in the first issue of Leverage that will be discussed at the next meeting.

NOTE: Carlos noted that Datacation does not work in Firefox only Safari. Shamena confirmed.

For the next meeting in two weeks, Facilitator: Alan; Minutes: Rick; Dialogue Manager: Ed; and Timekeeper: James.
Agenda: Leverage produced
Action Steps: Team members bring action plans.
No parking lot issues were discussed. Meeting was adjourned.

Respectfully submitted by,

Daisy


11/15/11 (TERC Feedback)
Last minute meeting with Dr. Heller and Diana Nunnaley – Director, Using Data Program TERC
Those in attendance,
Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Carroll, Mr. Castillo, Mrs. Collins-Smith, Ms Alli, Ms. Guadalupe, Mr. Gold

Team collaboration with Mrs. Diana Nunnaley about how TERC is being implemented into out data inquiry. How it has helped streamlined our research, identification processes and how it continues to give us the tools we need to create a strong action plan.

TERC has enabled us to identify trends, deficiencies in both Math and ELA. Also other then looking at exams, quarterly assessments and benchmarks we are, and continue to look at and decipher student work.

As a Team we spoke to Mrs. Naunnaley about the professional developments that were held, by department on Election Day. How we are turn keying our TERC training to our staff. Giving them the tools that are needed - to read, understand and identify trends and deficiencies within their own classes.

The projected out come for the professional development was that each teacher developed a foundation of data analysis. Along with an understanding on how to identify, break down, and implement said data. The expectation is that each teacher uses their own class data quarterly to identify and address students needs and deficiencies Thus creating a proper action plan to address theses needs.

Respectfully submitted by,
Mr. Gibbons


11/7/11
ELA Plan

Chart Paper
Quantitative and Qualitative Anayses: Noticings, Observations, Facts
Hypotheses
Action Plan

Performance Indicators on NYS State Exam
Standard 1. Information and Understanding.
  • Condense, combine, or categorize new information from one or more sources.
  • Apply thinking skills, such as define, classify, and infer, to interpret data, facts, and ideas from informational texts.
  • Draw conclusions and make inferences on the basis of explicit and implied information.
  • Identify a purpose for reading.
  • Identify missing, conflicting, or unclear information.
  • Use knowledge of structure, content, and vocabulary to understand informational text.
  • Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.
  • Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words by using context clues, a dictionary, a glossary, and structural analysis (i.e., looking at roots, pefixes, and suffixes of words).
  • Recall significant ideas and details and the relationships between and among them.

Standard 2. Literary Response and Expression
  • Interpret characters, plot, setting, theme, and dialogue, using evidence from the text.
  • Recognize how the author's use of language creates images or feelings.
  • Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words by using context clues, a dictionary, a glossary, and structural analysis (i.e., looking at roots, prefixes, and suffixes of words).
  • Determine how the use of literary devices, such as symbolism, metaphor, simile, alliteration, personification, flashback, and foreshadowing convey the author's message or intent.

Standard 3. Critical Analysis and Evaluation
  • Evaluate examples, details, or reasons used to support ideas.
  • Evaluate examples, details, or reasons used to support ideas.
  • Question the writer's assumptions, beliefs, intentions, and biases.
  • Identify differing points of view in texts and presentations.

NYS Test Data
Identify 3 problems that DIT saw in the test results.

8th Grade Talking Points
Test stamina was not a problem. Our students did equally well at the end of the exam, as they did in the beginning of the exam.

3 Interesting Performance Indicators: All questions with more than 25% of students getting the answer wrong, we consider "very poorly." Anything under 50% is poor performance.

Standard 2. Literary Response and Expression.
Interpret characters, plot, setting, theme, and dialogue, using evidence from the text. There were 10 questions on this indicator. Our students did well on 9 out of the 10 questions.

Standard 2. Literary Response and Expression.
Recognize how the author's use of language creates images or feelings. There were 3 questions on this indicator. Our students did poorly on 2 of these questions. On 1 of these questions, only 40% got the answer correct, 60% got the answer wrong.

Standard 3. Critical Analysis and Evaluation
Evaluate examples, details, or reasons used to support ideas. Four questions on this indicator. Our students did poorly on 3 of them.

7th Grade Talking Points
Of the 46 questions,
Standard 1. 21 Information and Understanding
Standard 2. 18 Literary Response and EXpression
Standard 3. 7 Critical Analysis and Evaluation

In the middle of the tests, students scores were comparatively lowers. Students did worst on questions, 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28.
24 -50% correct. Interpreting characters, plot, setting, and theme.
25 - 40% correct. Critical analysis and evaluation. Evaluate examples, details or reasons used to support ideas.
26 - 46% correct. Literary Response. Interpreting characters, plot, setting, and theme.
27 - 36% correct. Determining Meaning of unfamiliar words by using context clues. Literary Response and expression
28 - 28% correct. Interpreting characters, plot, and setting. Literary REsponse and Expression

At the end of the test, the scores were considerably higher.


Plan for Meeting 11/7/11
Co-Facilitators: Ed Bolan, Jim Gibbons
Minutes: Karen Phillips
Timekeeper: Alan Gold
Dialogue Manager: Lisa LaRosa

Today's Presentation
  • Diana DeVito, Network 208. Diane works with principals, asst. principals, and the teams.
Network is the liaison between Tweed and school.

Question. How can the lead data team support the extended teacher teams in the school in meeting the Chancellor’s expectations regarding the CCSS implementation?

Chancellor kicked out expectations for all teachers and all students.
Chancellor’s Expectations: Every student will have two encounter with a specific CCSS.

Folders
Agenda
1. Overview and History of Inquiry Initiative
2. QR Updates and Inquiry Work
3. Collaborative Inquiry Process
4. Inquiry Milestones
5. Inquiry and CCSS Citywide Expectations
6. Planning for Action

Vocabulary in Context
9 Strategies by Marzano. Whatever strategy you use will support the vocabulary
Isabell Beck’s work on vocabulary.

Strategy. Non-linguistic representations. Lots of pictures, lots of graphic organizers.
4 Corners – What word is, what is not, example of what it is, illustration
What kinds of words are children having trouble with?

Students need 12 encounters with a word before they own the word.

Collaborative Inquiry Process RUBRIC
Strategies are not specific to a subject. A strategy is cross-curricular and across grades.

School-wide Inquiry – We sit in on small teams.

Quality Review Rubric
Expectation for a well-developed school is that teacher teams meet 2-3 x per week.

Instructional expectations for every student in city system.
Must have 2 encounters with the CCSS, one in Literacy and one in Math.
DOE are putting so much money and time into CCSS.

Summary of Last Quality Review
What does the school do well?

What the school needs to improve?
Increase rigor and engagement for sub-groups
Daily formative assessments to drive differentiation.
Goal setting for sub-groups
Detailed feedback that is specific enough that it gives specific next steps – RUBRICS.

Expectations: Special Ed and ELLs must be brought up to grade level.

Citywide Instructional Expectations
  • Every team must look at student work in relation to the CCSS.
  • 1 ELA and 1 Math unit correlated with the CCSS.
  • Tasks must be normed to the CCSS. There is a protocol for this norming.
    • To norm, create a task and use the Webb Depth of Knowledge
    • In Math, there is a big disconnect between what the CCSS rolls out and the old NYS standards. The Math test has not been changed to align with the CCSS. When look at Math tasks, it is very detailed, and goes

Common Core Library at the NYC website: http://schools.nyc.gov

8th Grade – Lexile Band – You should be about 1180.

Literacy,
Reading. Grade 7. 1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Writing. Grade 7. 1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. SEE DRAFT Common Core Argument Writing Rubric Grade 7.

Have documents to show reviewer. The more they are looking at paper, the less they will talk.





DIT, 11-2-11
Next week’s meeting: Monday, November 7. We will plan for Tuesday. Next Thursday is Veterans’ Day.
11/3 Training. We would like to learn how to use filters, and break down between ELLs, SpEds, etc.
Materials to be copied.


Break-Outs for Election Day Workshops
ESL, ELA
Math & Science
Social Studies, Language, Speech, Paras

Carroll, Guadalupe, Williams, Askew – Social Studies, Language, Speech, Paras, Talent
Castillo, Gold, Greggo, LaRosa, Alan, Carlos, Lisa, Gregggo – Math & Science
Alli, Collins-Smith, Phillips, Bolan – ELA and ESL

Compare the performance indicators they did well and poorly on the ELA 2011 and the ELA Benchmark test.

Break-Outs by Departments and Room Assignments
ELA – We will have the data on the benchmark assessment - Library
Social Studies, Language, Speech, Paras – ELA Data – Room 206A
Math and Science – Math Data. Each grade did a 40 question test – Room 223

  1. How to find distractors and performance indicators.
  2. What we found on the State Exam.
  3. Have teachers break out and determine performance indicators on the baseline.

Disaggregated Data. For ELA, Jim Gibbons will make copies disaggregated data on ELLs, SpEd, Gender, Ethnicity.

Materials to Distribute
1. 3 Minutes – Finding performance indicators and distractors.
2. Review of what our team has found from the state results.
3. Hands-On Activity, using the Baseline Tests.
4. Compare and contrast how the students did on baseline with how they did on ELA.

Digitally – Start sort and break up disaggregated group

ELA has to be sorted so we can identify performance indicators.

Suggestion
  • Rick Carroll wrote 5 NYS-style articles, and composed 4 Words in Context questions per article.
  • Allowing a few months before the ELA, give them assessment tests that focus on one particular performance indicator.

  • Burning Issues – No. Concern about the compare and contrast section of break-out.
  • Share Out – Gibbons – same format for all groups. Opening up with analysis, show how to do filters. After filters, show them how to do sorts.
  • Intro, breakdown, benchmarks, work in groups – what trends are being identified. Compare and contrast state results with the benchmarks.
  • Come together , share out, and make plans.
  • For Math, the quarterly only covers beginning of year. There might not be enough data to contrast the baseline with the state exam.

Respectfully Submitted By
Karen Phillips




DIT, 10/27/11

DIT Next Meetings
  • Wednesday, 11/2/11
Food – James Gibbons
Facilitator’s Role – Doreen Collins-Smith
Danielle – Minutes
Timekeeper – Alan Gold
Dialogue Manager – Shamena Alli

  • Meeting 11/3/11 with Diana DeVito from CFN 208.

TO Do: Prepare Election Day Workshop for the teachers.
What are goals, objectives? What are we planning for teachers to get out of the day?
Show teachers, this is how you do it.
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Due to security issues we were unable to access the questions from the 2011 ELA exam.
Mr. Carroll stated that based on his analysis there is approximately a 25% increase in the difficulty of the exam from year to year.
Looking at 821 students and evaluated ARIS Data helped to substantiate this finding.
DIT Reviewed 7th grade scores and then evaluated the scores - and looked deeper at 6th grade performance.
Is there somewhere you can go to see the increase of difficulty in the exams as the years progresses?
That information could not be found, however, when you look at what determines one year’s progress for a student, if they receive a 3.2 one year and a 3.2 the second year that student was considered to have made one years progress, so there must be some account for the increase of difficulty.
The lens of evaluating progress has changed.
Are the students making true progress since the exams seem to increasing in complexity?
DG- the exams are actually structured differently by grade. IE- 7th grade didn’t have a essay question in the past but when they get to grade 8, they are asked to do extended responses.
JG- there are many factors that can contribute to the drop in scores.
KP- we need to look at the actual questions on the exam in order to get a true idea of what happened.
EB- it would be interesting to see what the performance or decline in scores are percentage wise as compared to the state and the city.
RC- looking at the data for the students in the SP classes, would be a great way to predict how the rest of the population is performing.
KP- www.p12nysed.gov is a website that detailed the mean score performance and additional test information. She will email the link.
1 hour given to further analyze data that Ms. Collins-Smith detailed based on the ELA Reading Benchmark for Grade 8. ELA Book 1 grade 2009
EB- if you refer to the data analysis provided by Bolan to the Superintendent, you see that the students showed a decline in the school, district, and city. It confirms the theory of Mr. Carrol that the test complexity increases.
Potential Strategies – We looked at any question where less than 400 students scored correctly.
  • Looking at the paragraph and passages as a distractor.
  • Looking at student needs and learning styles to determine approaches to the exam.
  • Is it possible to teach the skills necessary to understand poetry (like figurative language) through other forms of text?
  • Having teachers take low-inference observations with the students to discuss the behaviors that they are seeing while the students are testing.
  • How are we teaching our kids to check our answers or even analyze our answers.
  • “Most likely” or “best” questions. Seem to get a scattering of answers.
o Strategies to approach the words that seem to confuse the children.
o Is it possible to have the ELA department compile a list of 10 terms that can be taught interdisciplinary so the students can have an increased familiarity with the terms.
  • Pilot a program within the classes that can be given strategies
Parking Lot issues
One person speaking without everyone adding an opinion. We kept getting off task.
The purpose of an early agenda is to stay focused. We can not ignore the dialogue monitor.
Try to respect the time frame of the tasks.
Next Steps:
  • Look at the additional exams in groups.
  • Facilitator- Gibbons again!
  • Minutes- Phillips
  • Time Keeper- Carrol
  • Dialogue – Bolan
  • Castillo - Snacks

Teaching skills in context to apply them out of context.

Agenda 10/27/11
Please bring high lighters and a fully charged laptop.

3:10 - 3:15 – Set up and distribution of materials.
3:15 - 4:30 – Break into respective groups according to grade 6,7 and 8
  • Review and break down of tests.
  1. Identify percentage of “correct answer” response and Performance Indicators. (Establish cutoff for correct response %)
  2. Identify Distractors and possible cause.
4:30 – 4:45 – Share out
  • What did we find the initial trend deficiencies to be?
  • What is out tentative plan to begin addressing and correcting the deficiencies?
  • Brainstorm - devising and forming strategies.

4:45 - 5:00 – Overview and expectations - Mr. Gibbons
  • CFN meeting with Donna Devito on 11/03/11.­­
5:00 – 5:10 - Parking lot/Management/Clean up
  • 5:00- 5:07 Parking lot issues
    • 5:07- 5:10 Set roles for next meeting
    • Clean up

Jim Gibbons went to a Data Meeting with Diana DeVito, CFN Data expert. She is coming on 11/3 to meet with us. We cannot see last year’s questions. We have to look at the problematic performance indicators.
ELA test
They want us to look at the questions. If the right answer %s are low, we should be targeting the standard.
We have to be able to justify why we picked a particular strand to look at.
Going over our benchmark tests, ARIS, and Acuity we will target strands to look at.
Castillo – the way they construct the questions are very important. Last year they gave the students a question about reflection on x and y axis. But we don’t teach the slanted line, where it would be reflected between 2nd and 3rd quadrant.

Professional Development for Election Day
2 hours, by subject, looking at benchmark administered in October. Look at by grade and by sub-group.
We should be looking at last year’s test.
Ed Bolan: Should we look at the 46 questions, and digitally sort
Bill Heller - compare last year’s benchmark with current benchmark.
  1. Needs of my current students
  2. How am I teaching to these standards
Do the item skills analysis with current test.
Teachers will be more receptive to “How can I help the kids,” rather than, “How well do I teach?”
Analyzing the benchmarks
How are my kids doing against the benchmark?
How am I doing teaching the performance indicators?
Some strands are only 1 question, then don’t focus down on that performance strand.
Look for patterns.
Minutes on wiki from last year. Go back to that wiki and see if there was a specific standard or performance indicator that they are still having trouble with.
Are they having trouble with measurement over the past few years.
Vocabulary
Doreen – For Election Day, look at the strands, see where they are falling down, then design strategies that the teachers can do.
2 Strategies – Vocabulary Driven
1 workshop on the analyses of the benchmarks
1 workshop on vocabulary analysis

ELA, Social, Science Tests – are the tests tied to the benchmarks.
Analyze the current benchmarks and compare it to the data from last year’s tests.

Math – Tied to current standards, but we should also integrate Common Core.
Each question can be tied to Social Studies Scope & Sequence performance indicators.
Science aligned with Science Scope & Sequence.
Diane DeVito coming in next week. We will ask her to address:
  • What are the expectations of a lead data team supporting individual teams, and what are the expectations for the individual data teams.
Hypothesize, Gather Information, Analyze Results, Draw Conclusions
Break- Outs. We looked at 6th and 7th Grade ELA benchmark test we recently gave students (2009 State Exam).
Looked at the 6th grade reading benchmark (2009 State Exam).
  1. Stamina – point tout to teachers that stamina has to be considered, built into test prep.
  2. Sequencing
  3. Genre
  4. Vocabulary
  5. Questions with bolded words or phrases
Looked at 7th grade ELA.
  1. Vocabulary
  2. Not thinking abstractly.
  3. Trouble predicting, interpreting, inferring.
  4. Have trouble with abstract thinking
Inferencing and prediction trouble is also true for Math and Science.
SHARE OUT
Ed Bolan – we must get focused for what we want to present Wednesday/Thursday, so we know what we’re presenting on Election Day.
Next Steps:
Monday or Tuesday Free Time, when we can meet
Email Gibbons our free periods.
Independent meetings during Monday and Tuesday.
Email summary of independent meetings to whoever is running the meeting.
Respectfully submitted,
Karen Phillips

11/20/11

Due to security issues we were unable to access the questions from the 2011 ELA exam.
Mr. Carroll stated that based on his analysis there is approximately a 25% increase in the difficulty of the exam from year to year.
Looking at 821 students and evaluated ARIS Data helped to substantiate this finding.
DIT Reviewed 7th grade scores and then evaluated the scores - and looked deeper at 6th grade performance.
Is there somewhere you can go to see the increase of difficulty in the exams as the years progresses?
That information could not be found, however, when you look at what determines one year’s progress for a student, if they receive a 3.2 one year and a 3.2 the second year that student was considered to have made one years progress, so there must be some account for the increase of difficulty.
The lens of evaluating progress has changed.
Are the students making true progress since the exams seem to increasing in complexity?
DG- the exams are actually structured differently by grade. IE- 7th grade didn’t have a essay question in the past but when they get to grade 8, they are asked to do extended responses.
JG- there are many factors that can contribute to the drop in scores.
KP- we need to look at the actual questions on the exam in order to get a true idea of what happened.
EB- it would be interesting to see what the performance or decline in scores are percentage wise as compared to the state and the city.
RC- looking at the data for the students in the SP classes, would be a great way to predict how the rest of the population is performing.
KP- www.p12nysed.gov is a website that detailed the mean score performance and additional test information. She will email the link.
1 hour given to further analyze data that Ms. Collins-Smith detailed based on the ELA Reading Benchmark for Grade 8. ELA Book 1 grade 2009
EB- if you refer to the data analysis provided by Bolan to the Superintendent, you see that the students showed a decline in the school, district, and city. It confirms the theory of Mr. Carrol that the test complexity increases.
Potential Strategies – We looked at any question where less than 400 students scored correctly.
  • Looking at the paragraph and passages as a distractor.
  • Looking at student needs and learning styles to determine approaches to the exam.
  • Is it possible to teach the skills necessary to understand poetry (like figurative language) through other forms of text?
  • Having teachers take low-inference observations with the students to discuss the behaviors that they are seeing while the students are testing.
  • How are we teaching our kids to check our answers or even analyze our answers.
  • “Most likely” or “best” questions. Seem to get a scattering of answers.
o Strategies to approach the words that seem to confuse the children.
o Is it possible to have the ELA department compile a list of 10 terms that can be taught interdisciplinary so the students can have an increased familiarity with the terms.
  • Pilot a program within the classes that can be given strategies
Parking Lot issues
One person speaking without everyone adding an opinion. We kept getting off task.
The purpose of an early agenda is to stay focused. We can not ignore the dialogue monitor.
Try to respect the time frame of the tasks.
Next Steps:
  • Look at the additional exams in groups.
  • Facilitator- Gibbons again!
  • Minutes- Phillips
  • Time Keeper- Carrol
  • Dialogue – Bolan
  • Castillo - Snacks

Teaching skills in context to apply them out of context.
Respectfully submited
Mrs. Askew



10/6/2011
Data Inquiry Team Planning
  1. Introductions
  2. Reflection on 2010-2011 DIT achievements and areas for improvement
  3. Expectations and responsibilities
  4. Norms
  5. AP Data Presentations on 2011 ELA and Math data

Expectations and responsibilities:
  1. DIT members will arrive at 3:10 PM and will actively participate in the weekly planning sessions.
  2. A list of meeting norms will be documented during the first meeting.
  3. The DIT will set the calendar dates for 2010 -2011.
  4. The data inquiry team will analyze school based subject exams during MP 1-4.
  5. The data inquiry team will publish a quarterly report of its findings based upon the MP 1-4 subject assessments. The quarterly report must be finalized no later than one week following the subject assessment.
  6. The data inquiry team will facilitate subject data days throughout the school year.
  7. The data inquiry team will utilize one preparation period per week to review student data, research best practices, and/or plan with a DIT member.
  8. The agenda for DIT meetings will be created by a DIT member on a rotating basis.
  9. DIT minutes and agendas will be placed on our 2011 school wiki.
DIT 10-6-2011
Next Meeting: Thursday, 10/13/11
Facilitator: Ed Bolan
Minutes: Rick Carroll
Dialogue Manager: James Gibbons
Timekeeper: Daisy Guadalupe

Agenda for 10/13/11
Finalize Norms
Look through item-skills analysis, if it’s out.
Log-in to NY Start. Look at specific questions, and see how this year’s 8th grade did on specific questions.

Data Inquiry Team Planning
Introductions
Patrick Burns, Principal
Alan Gold, 302 - 701, 702, 704
Carlos Castillo – 308; 893, 894, 831
Rick Carroll, 301 – 821, 833, 805
James Gibbons, 221, Science, 893
Ed Bolan, 229. Extension 228
Doreen Collins-Smith, B27, ext 527, or class 832, Room 214
Raevan Askew, Room 110, ext 110
Danielle Williams, 202A, ext 217, 791, 792, 793, 732, 894 - SpEd Social Studies
John Greggo, Math & Science, 361,
Daisy Guadalupe, 6th Grade 603, 604, 622; ELA – T4 – 458
Shamena Alli, 601, 602, 621, ext. 462
Karen Phillips, 129, ext 129. Green Magnet Production Company – 8 Classes: 6, 7, 8th grade A&T, L&G, M&S

1. Introductions
2. Reflection on 2010-2011 DIT achievements and areas for improvement. 6th DIT Year.
  • 2 minute reflection on DIT achievements and areas to improve upon.
3. Expectations and Responsibilities

Achievements
i. DIT improved in the area of SpEd. The 2010-2011 SpEd students didn’t do as well as expected. We targeted specific students, and we saw those SpEd students’ scores rise in Math, and not sure about ELA.
ii. Increased use of acceptance of data. In the school teacher teams are analyzing data and they are comfortable doing so.
iii. Staff more comfortable opening up RESI. Teachers are asking for more data.
iv. Leverage newsletter was helpful. Some teachers said that the newletter with the leverage points helped them.
v. By DIT putting out Leverage, the staff saw what DIT was doing and helped them feel more comfortable.
vi. TERC training. How to read data, identify trends, identify distractors. How to set our strategies to reduce distractor errors. Re-tested with similar distractors, and wrong answers dropped off slightly. We only did this in the DIT.
vii. We analyzed the ELA and Math results and we selected weaknesses. The use of figurative language and vocabulary. We did this in April.
viii. Over the years, the data team has changed the way everyone thinks of data. Staff members are not afraid of it. The reason is the data team has gotten larger, and is an expert on teacher teams. We have representatives from different teams. DIT members have become leaders in their own teacher teams.
ix. The DIT looked at our school and schools that are similar, demographically. WE compared where we are and where they are, and we said if they are doing something, we decided to try doing what they were doing. We also identified our strengths.

Improvements
i. Give out hard reports. The data has been reviewed by the DIT, and then the teacher comes up with the strategies to address needs.
ii. Need to work on survey. If we effectively put surveymonkey together, we might get a better idea of where strengths and weaknesses are, not only for team, but for rest of school.
iii. Develop a report letting teachers know how their students did in September. Create this data as a bar graph.
iv. Visit peer schools
v. We need to gather hard evidence of improvement.
vi. Work on structure of meetings, roles and responsibilities. It helps us to focus when we have time, agenda, roles, and responsibilities.
vii. Providing as much modeling as possible for teams that we are not on. Invite teachers into rooms. We still have teachers who are drowning in data. They are afraid to ask for help. We need to reach out to them and offer help. Some of the old teachers still need assistance.
viii. Find ways to make teachers more comfortable with data.

QUESTION
What does all of this mean for us this year? What are our goals for the school year for the DIT.

Meeting Days. DIT will set calendar dates for 2011-2012. We can move meetings from Thursdays, if the team decides. Thursdays are not good for Dr. Heller, because he’s teaching at NYU on Thursdays.
Data inquiry team will analyze school-based subject exams during marking periods 1-4.

Quarterly Tests. Mr. Bolan, Mr. Greggo, Ms. Askew, Ms. Collins-Smith will develop the quarterly test, and get it back to the teachers before the end of the marking period, so teachers can re-teach and re-test.
Mr. Bolan, Mr. Greggo, Ms. Askew will distribute an outline of yearly departmental assessments and dates.
We will assess what we’re teaching.
This team will have to break into department groups and assess how we did as a school, how we did as a grade, how our demographics did on an assessment.

Expectations and Responsibilities
5. Quarterly Report based on MP 1-4 quarterly assessments. Must be distributed in a 1 page format and no later than one week following the subject assessment. Teachers will be able to see what strategies they must address.
6. Data Day – 1st one will be Election Day.
7. DIT will utilize one prep period per week to review student data, research best practices, and/or plan with a DIT member.
8. Agenda for DIT meetings will be created by a DIT member on a rotating basis.
9. DIT minutes and agendas will be placed on our 2011 school wiki.

Setting Norms
Interpersonal Norms and Procedural Norms
Respect the opinion of other members, even if they disagree.
Clear and specific expectations – Roles, Responsibilities, Deadlines, Goals,
Agenda distributed, at a minimum, 24 hours prior to the meeting. Every section of the agenda has proposed times. Parking lot with burning issues is part of every agenda.
One person speaks at a time.
If disagreement, no more than 5 minutes for hashing out disagreements.

Roles: Facilitator, Timekeeper, Dialogue Manager, Recording. Roles will rotate.
Facilitator distributes the agenda 24 hours in advance. On agenda, facilitator designates roles.
Plan agenda at end of each meeting. We end with next steps, the agenda, and roles. If a person who has a role for upcoming meeting cannot make it, that person is responsible for getting a substitute.
Schedule - Once we agree on meeting dates, we keep to that schedule.
Quorum – 5 people.
Close to the end – Share out. Prior to the final 10 minutes of the meeting, we have a formal share-out.
Minutes – end with Respectfully submitted …
Burning Issue: Too many assessments.
5. Assistant Principals.
Mr Bolan and Ms. Askew made a presentation to Superintendent on the ELA data, Ms. Askew and Mr. Greggo made a presentation to Superintendent on the Math data.
Within next few days, the DOE will be publishing the item analysis reports for the Math and ELA 2011 exams.
Mr. Bolan – NYS ELA Exam Data Analysis Report
Please see report posted at DIT on wiki.
Few things that were significant.
ELLS, our 8th grade ELLs. In the 6th grade, 2.4, 7th graders 2.3.
Our 6th grade 2010, went from 2.4 to 2.3.
In order to reach AYP, we need more students scoring 3 or better.
We identified 23 ELLs who are only a couple of questions off from a 3.0.
Last year, Ms. Collins-Smith did a two’s to three’s program for all students who were close to threes. Half of the sixth graders increased to threes. That was a specific pull-out program.
SWDs – the performance for ELA 6-8, mirrored what our GenEd students did.
One of our targets, our self-contained SWDs didn’t make AYP. We are looking at 21 students who are SWDs and ELLs.
When multiple choice reviewed, there was a wide gap between General Ed and ELLs. When we analyzed the exam, we came up with specifics. ELLs did better and SWDs did better on certain questions that GenEd students. Seemed to be questions with ambiguous information for SWDs.
There is an overlap of SWDs and ELLs – 21 students who are in both categories. One of groups of students who we are targeting. 894 is self-contained and they are all ELLs. ELL services are built into their program. We’ll be able to look to see if that will make a difference.
ELL self-contained for 8th grade, 892 and 7th grade, 792. 12-1 classes.
2nd target for SWDs – when we looked at progress report, closing the achievement gap. 12% of students in self-contained are meeting proficiency in ELA or Math. Looked at all SWDs that are in a .5 range of meeting proficiency that are in self-contained classes – 14 for ELA, and 12 for Math.
Explicit Teaching – word work and teaching reading strategies. We’re not comfortable teaching reading skills, so some of professional development will be focused on teaching reading strategies and skills.
One of things we want to do is develop a relationship with these students. Boys don’t do as well. We are going to select the boys and take them to Barnes & Noble to purchase a book of their choice.

MATH – report under Math on wiki.
We made AYP for all groups, except for ELLs.
If ELLs are in the country for a day, they have to take the Math NYS test.
ELLs – how are the different language groups doing?
Spanish, Arabic, Urdu, Bengali
Translation services don’t address students’ needs, because some children had no literacy in their own language, and they weren’t taught in the original language.

  1. Future:1st Data Day – Election Day.
  2. Burning Issue - Concern - # of assessments

Respectfully Submitted,
Karen Phillips
New York State ELA Exam Data
Analysis Report

The focus of this report is a comparative analysis of the New York State English Language Arts Exam, comparing the school wide results to our English Language Learners in M.S. 217 using the academic year 09/10 and the results of academic year 2010/11.
Performance Levels
M.S. 217 NYS School Report Card indicated that AYP was achieved in 6 of the 8 categories in ELA. AYP was not met for SWD and Limited English Proficient students.
An examination of the sixth grade ELA performance levels of all students indicates that there was a decrease in students performing at Level 2 and above from 84% to 80%. Students performing at a Level 3 remained the same, at 45%. Sixth gradeELLstudents dropped from 40% to 33% for students scoring 2’s or higher. Students scoring 3 or above on the exam, rose from 3% to 8%, an increase of five percent.
Seventh grade ELA performance levels of all students indicates that there was a decrease in the percentage of students scoring 3 or higher; 44% to 40% and a decrease of students scoring 2’s or higher from 89% to 88%. Seventh gradeELLstudents scoring 2 and above went from 63% to 52% and 3’s or higher from 7% to 2%.
Eighth grade ELA performance levels of all students indicates that there was an increase in students scoring 3s or higher from 37% to38% and an increase in students scoring 2’s or higher from 90% to 92%. Eighth grade ELL students scored 2’s or higher and rose from 56% to 64%; 3 or higher dropped from 4% to 3%.
Following the same cohort of students, the graduation class of 2011. As 7th graders - 44% scored 3’s or higher; 8th graders - 38% scored 3’s or higher. A drop of 6%. As 7th graders - 89% scored 2s or higher and as 8th graders - 92% scored 2’s or higher, a 3% increase.
ELLstudents from the Class of 2011 scored 63% as 7th graders and 64% in the 8th grade for 2’s or higher. In the 7th grade, the ELLstudents had 7% score 3’s or above and 3% scored 3’s or higher as 8th graders.
Content Analysis
An analysis of the 46 one point questions for 6th grade students showed there were 13 questions with a 30% or greater gap between our ELLstudents compared to all students taking the exam. There were 12 questions the ELLstudents scored below 30% correct. There were 2 questions the ELLstudents out performed the GE population. The questions had the same performance indicator. There were 6 questions total on this indicator. Indicator 2 identifies literary elements.
An analysis of the 46 one point questions for 7th grade students showed there were 7 questions with a 30% or greater gap between ELLstudents compared to all students taking the exam. There were 5 questions the ELLstudents scored below 30% correct. There was one question the ELLstudents out performed the GE population. There were 3 questions on this indicator. Indicator 3 determines the meaning of unfamiliar words using context clues, a dictionary, a glossary, and structural analysis.
An analysis of the 46 one point questions for 8th grade students showed that there were ten questions with 30% or greater gap between ELLstudents and all students taking the exam. There were 8 questions ELLstudents scored below 30% correct. The ELLstudents out performed the GE students on 1 question. There were two questions on this indicator. Indicator 1 determines the meaning of unfamiliar words by using context clues, a dictionary, a glossary, and structural analysis.
Inferences
Based on the findings of the comparative analysis of all students taking the ELA Exam to ELLstudents the following areas should be targeted for improvement:
Sixth Grade
  • Identify missing, conflicting, unclear and irrelevant information
  • Recognize organizational formats to assist in comprehension of informational texts
  • Read to collect and interpret data facts and ideas
Seventh Grade -
  • Use knowledge of structure, content, and vocabulary to understand informational text
  • Interpret characters, plot, setting and theme, using evidence from the text
Eighth Grade -
  • Interpret characters, plot, setting, theme, and dialogue, using evidence from the text
  • Identify missing, conflicting, or unclear information
Targets
* English Language Learner students that scored 2.89 to 2.93 on the ELA exam
* All 8th grade ELL and former ELL students for the class of 2012
Improvement Plan
* Teacher will begin a target data-analysis to target smaller subsets of students
* ELLteachers will utilize the Rosetta Stone program to improve student vocabulary. PD will be delivered through out the year
* All ELA and ESL teachers will use the Achieve 3000 Program. In September teachers will be trained on the new English Language Learners unit.
A comparison of ELA Exam proficiency results for 2010 2011
Grade
NYC
District
MS 217
Rank
6th 2010
40.1
51.5
45.0
7/36
6th 2011
43.6
54.4
45.1
8/36
7th 2010
38.2
43.4
43.9
6/36
7th 2011
36.5
42.0
40.5
6/36
8th 2010
37.5
43.3
37.3
16/36
8th 2011
35.0
39.0
38.3
7/36
A comparison of ELL students proficiency on ELA state exam for 2010 & 2011
Grade
NYC
District
MS 217
Rank
6th 2010
5.3
5.9
2.4

6th 2011
5.7
7.1
8.3

7th 2010
4.3
5.4
6.3

7th 2011
3.3
5.0
2.3

8th 2010
2.9
5.4
4.4

8th 2011
2.3
3.6
2.7

Special Eduaction ELA/MATH data anaylsis



October 12, 2011